Piano chords with pictures and audio examples

Hey there,

I’m really glad you’re here. The goal of this page is to become the number one resource for all your piano chord questions. It designed for piano players and electronic music producers who want to learn more about piano chords and how to form them.

Each section is divided into three main parts, an intro section – which tells you a bit more about the chord type and chord formula, followed by a list of all the chords and finally images to go along with each chord.

I’ve also included a simple formula that you can use to form each type of chord. This is really useful for people who produce music using a computer/digital audio workstation (DAW)

So let’s get started.

Major Piano Chords

The major chord is formed or constructed by using the root note, a major third and a perfect fifth.

Example: Let’s suppose you want to construct the D major chord, in this case the root note will be D, the major third note will be F♯ and the perfect fifth note will be A. This is how we arrive at the D major piano chord.

Major Piano Chord Formula

Another easy way to form a major chord is by starting off on a root note, counting four steps to the right of it. The note that we land on will be the second note in the chord.

Once we find the second note, we then count three steps to the right of that note and the note that we land on will be the third note of the chord.

Example:

Let’s suppose you want to construct the D major chord, you first start by finding the root note, which is D and then by counting four steps to right of the note D, we end up on the note F♯.

From the note F♯, we count three steps to the right, this leads us to the note A.

Understood?

This method of counting will help computer musicians form any major chord very quickly.

12 Major Piano Chords

I’ve listed the 12 major piano chords and the notes that form them below:

C major chord – [C, E, G]

D major chord – [D, F♯, A]

E major chord – [E, G♯, B]

F♯ major chord – [F♯, A♯, C♯]

A♭ major chord – [A♭, C, E♭]

B♭ major chord – [B♭, D, F]

C♯ major chord – [C♯, E♯, G♯]

E♭ major chord – [E♭, G, B♭]

F major chord – [F, A, C]

G major chord – [G, B, D]

A major chord – [A, C♯, E]

B major chord – [B, D♯, F♯]

C Major Chord

C♯ Major Chord

D Major Chord

E♭ major chord

E Major Chord

F Major Chord

F♯ Major Chord

G Major Chord

A♭ major chord

A Major Chord

B♭ major chord

B Major Chord

Minor Piano Chords

The minor chord is formed or constructed by using the root note, minor third and a perfect fifth.

Example: Let’s assume you want to construct the b minor chord, in this case the root note will be B, the minor third note will be D and the perfect fifth note will be F♯. This is how we arrive at the B minor piano chord.

Minor Piano Chord Formula

Another easy way to form a minor chord is by starting off on a root note, counting three steps to the right of it. The note that we land on will be the second note in the chord.

Once we find the second note, we then count four steps to the right of that note and the note that we land on will be the third note of the chord.

Example:

Let’s suppose you want to construct the b minor chord, you first start by finding the root note, which is B and then by counting three steps to right of the note B, we end up on the note D.

From the note D, we count four steps to the right, this leads us to the note F♯.

This simple counting method makes it really easy to form any minor chord even if you are new to music theory or even electronic music production.

12 Minor Piano Chords

I’ve listed the 12 minor piano chords and the notes that form them below:

C minor chord – [C, E♭, G]

C♯ minor chord – [C♯, E, G♯]

D minor chord – [D, F, A]

E♭ minor chord – [E♭ G♭ B♭]

E minor chord – [E, G, B]

F minor chord – [F, A♭, C]

F♯ minor chord – [F♯, A, C♯]

G minor chord – [G, B♭, D]

A♭ minor chord – [A♭, C♭, E♭]

A minor chord – [A, C, E]

B♭ minor chord – [B♭, D♭, F]

B minor chord – [B, D, F♯]

C minor chord

C♯ Minor Chord

D Minor Chord

E♭-minor chord

E minor chord

F minor chord

F♯-minor chord

G minor chord

A♭ minor chord

A minor chord

B♭ minor chord

B minor chord

Diminished Piano Chords

The diminished piano chord is formed or constructed by using the root note, minor third and a flattened fifth. It is represented by the symbol °. Example C diminished can be written as Cdim or C°.

Example: Let’s assume you want to construct the C diminished chord, in this case the root note will be C, the minor third note will be E♭ and the flattened fifth note will be G♭. This is how we arrive at the C diminished piano chord.

Diminished Piano Chord Formula

Another easy way to form a diminished chord is by starting off on a root note, counting three steps to the right of it. The note that we land on will be the second note in the chord.

From the second note, we then count three steps to the right, and the note that we land on will be the third note of the chord.

Example: Let’s suppose you want to construct the C diminished chord, you first start by finding the root note, which is C and then by counting three steps to right of the note C, we end up on the note E♭.

From the note E♭, we count three steps to the right, this leads us to the note G♭.

This simple counting method makes it easy to form any diminished chord even if you are new to music production.

12 Diminished Piano Chords

I’ve listed the 12 diminished piano chords and the notes that form them below:

C diminished – [C, E♭, G♭]

C♯ diminished – [C♯, E, G]

D diminished – [D, F, A♭]

E♭ diminished – [E♭, G♭, A]

E diminished – [E, G, B♭]

F diminished – [F, A♭, B]

F♯ diminished – [F♯, A, C]

G diminished – [G, B♭, D♭]

A♭ diminished – [A♭, C♭, D]

A diminished – [A, C, E♭]

B♭ diminished – [B♭, D♭, E]

B diminished – [B, D, F]

C diminished – [C, E♭, G♭]

C♯ diminished – [C♯, E, G]

D diminished – [D, F, A♭]

E♭ diminished – [E♭, G♭, A]

E diminished – [E, G, B♭]

F diminished – [F, A♭, B]

F♯ diminished – [F♯, A, C]

G diminished – [G, B♭, D♭]

A♭ diminished – [A♭, C♭, D]

A diminished – [A, C, E♭]

B♭ diminished – [B♭, D♭, E]

B diminished – [B, D, F]

Augmented Piano Chords

The augmented piano chord is formed or constructed by using the root note, major third and a sharpened or raised fifth. It is represented by the symbol +. Example C augmented can be written as C aug or C+.

Example: Let’s assume you want to construct the C augmented chord, in this case the root note will be C, the major third note will be E and the raised fifth note will be G♯. This is how you can build the C aug chord.

Augmented Piano Chord Formula

Another easy way to form an augmented chord is by starting off on a root note, counting four steps to the right of it. The note that we land on will be the second note in the chord.

From the second note, again we count four steps to the right, and the note that we land on will be the third note of the chord.

Example:Let’s suppose you want to construct the C augmented chord, you first start by finding the root note, which is C and then by counting four steps to right of the note C, we end up on the note E.

From the note E, we count three steps to the right, this leads us to the note G♯.

This simple counting method makes it easy to form any augmented chord even if you are new to music theory.

12 Augmented Piano Chords

I’ve listed the 12 augmented piano chords and the notes that form them below:

C augmented – [C, E, G♯]

D augmented – [D, F♯, A♯]

E augmented – [E, G♯, B♯]

F♯ augmented – [F♯, A♯, D]

A♭ augmented – [A♭, C, E]

B♭ augmented – [B♭, D, F♯]

C♯ augmented – [C♯ E♯, A]

E♭ augmented – [E♭, G, B]

F augmented – [F, A, C♯]

G augmented – [G, B, D♯]

A augmented – [A, C♯, F]

B augmented – [B, D, G]